Overview

This project is being championed by Nik Nanos, founder of Nanos Research and Chair of Carleton’s Board of Governors. Over the course of the 2018-2019 academic year, the Carleton University Indigenous Strategic Initiatives Committee (CUISIC) facilitated widespread engagement sessions in order to develop a set of Carleton-specific recommendations as part of an institutional response to support the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.  As Chair of the Board, Mr. Nanos has been integral in helping to establish this fund as part of his commitment to supporting programs that provide access to higher education.

Indigenous Enriched Support Program (IESP) School Mentoring Fund program offers an opportunity for Carleton students to work as peer mentors with Indigenous elementary and high school students in the Ottawa area, through involvement in the classroom, lunchtime or after-school programs and/or cultural clubs. Currently Carleton students mentor weekly at one or more of the following sites: the Odawa Urban Aboriginal Alternative High School, which offers a fully Indigenous and holistic learning environment; Queen Elizabeth Public School, which offers extensive learning opportunities and supports for Indigenous students; and the Odawa Native Friendship Centre Akwego Program, an after-school cultural program for children and youth.

The mentors are role models who provide cultural knowledge and activities as well as academic support for Indigenous students through sharing learning strategies, traditional activities and practical advice. Using their own elementary, high school and post-secondary experiences mentors help Indigenous students bridge the transitions between elementary, high school, post-secondary and career pathways. The positive relationship between mentor and student helps increase confidence, contributes to the achievement of goals, and fosters an understanding about learning and life challenges. Mentors themselves work in cohesive teams and support each other throughout the school year. This position is of interest to Carleton students in all disciplines, and provides experience that has been of particular benefit to those interested in teaching, social work, child and youth work, recreation, and other human services professions. It also offers a unique opportunity to develop strong leadership skills.

Program Goals:

  • Foster understanding of students’ own and others First Nations, Metis and Inuit identities and histories, comfort with identity, and a sense of pride in these identities
  • Provide encouragement and support to Indigenous students in their efforts to thrive in school and community programs
  • Share learning experiences and knowledge to develop and enhance Indigenous cultural knowledge and understanding
  • Dispel confusion and false perceptions about post-secondary learning
  • Encourage students to stay in school and to consider different options after completing their studies
  • Develop leadership, communication and solution-based skills

The Background

Carleton’s Indigenous Enriched Support Program (IESP) supports the educational aspirations and success of Indigenous youth. It runs a mentorship program that matches Carleton Indigenous students with Indigenous youth at elementary and high schools. The program strengthens educational opportunities for Indigenous youth across critical developmental periods. Many of the students who receive mentoring are facing tremendous challenges in their personal lives —issues of poverty, homelessness, early parenthood, and, in some cases, abuse. Student mentors offer a source of stability and support that can create defining moments in times of major life decisions, such as the choice to stay in school. Mentors share valuable learning experiences and offer practical advice to students. Beyond supporting elementary and high school youth, this program builds mentors’ leadership capacity and confidence.

The Rollout

The program currently runs with 10 mentors and 50-60 mentees at 3 local schools and is in high demand. With new donor support, programming would be expanded in the following ways:

  • Suicide prevention workshops. Suicide rates in Canada are three times higher among the Indigenous population than the non-Indigenous population, with the highest instances occurring among youth and young adults. There are professional workshops IESP would like to be able to enroll its program participants in to combat this alarming reality. This will include providing our mentors with vital training on intervention.
  • Cultural workshops (examples include: beading, drum making, ribbon skirt making, moccasin/mukluk making, snowshoe making, mitten making). These are wonderful opportunities for students to connect and become more involved in their Indigenous communities. In some cases, Elders would be invited to participate and lead activities.
  • Field trips where mentors and mentees can visit a local museum, healing lodge or similar place. These are great opportunities for learning beyond the traditional classroom.

The Impact

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report has led to an enhanced and much-needed focus on the lives of Indigenous Peoples and their communities. One way the commission’s report had a particular impact on the IESP is that it emphasized the importance of Indigenization within Canada’s elementary and high schools. There has been increased demand for Carleton students to serve as mentors to Indigenous students K-12.Your support will help the IESP continue to strengthen educational opportunities.

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